Search Site
News
Home >> Our Kōrero >> News >> News Feed

Two prominent Māori langiuage experts have voiced their opposition to a decree from their tribal authority. Te Uru Taumatua have dropped the 'ng' in written publications in an attempt to affirm the distinctive dialect of Tūhoe. Te Okiwa McLean reports. Te...

Some Tuhoe are reclaiming their dialect by dropping the 'g' in the word 'ng' when writing and speaking māori. Te Uru Taumatua Chairman Tamati Kruger says if your language is your identity, it is dialect which identifies who you are and where you come from. Te Kawa o Te Urewera, written in Tūhoe dialect by Te Uru Taumatua is missing the 'g' in 'ng'. Tūhoe leader Tamati Kruger says there is no 'g' in the...

Māori broadcaster, Puhi Rangiaho, has passed away after a long illness.  She died at Tauranga Hospital surrounded by whānau last night. Puhi Rangiaho,  Ngāi Tūhoe, was among the first to lead Māori broadcasting into mainstream, with Waka Huia alumni like Whai Ngata. She was a director of the Aotearoa Television Network which faced many challenges but also paved the hard fought establishment of Māori Television. With an...

A pioneer in Māori film and television has died. Puhi Rangiaho, of Ngāi Tūhoe, passed away after a long illness. But as Peata Melbourne reports, the trail blazing director will always be remembered for her dedication and commitment to te reo Māori. Te...

An innocent warrior

4 August 2016

A Maori activist's fight for his people after being accused of running a paramilitary training camp in New Zealand.   In 2007 New Zealand police arrested charismatic Maori leader Tame Iti and others in anti-terrorist raids after a period of surveillance.   In a long trial, Iti and three other people (the "Urewera Four") were accused of running a terrorist training camp and of being members of a criminal...

Parks are people too

3 August 2016

A movement to imbue land, rivers, and entire ecosystems with legal personhood status is gaining ground in the U.S. o years ago, when New Zealand’s government granted legal personhood to one of its 13 national parks—Te Urewera, a lush, forested landscape teeming with trails and waterfalls on the North Island—some 821 square miles was suddenly protected not as land but as a citizen.    The law was called...

Home >> Our Kōrero >> News >> News Feed Back to top