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Array ( [item_id] => 924 [title] => Getting out of the Ground [html] =>
It’s always an exciting moment when you can say ‘we’re out of the ground’, meaning you’ve gotten through the bulk of earthworks, ground conditions are ticked off and you’re into foundations of the building. 
 
This moment is even more satisfying when your site has been hit by not one, but two cyclones; when the main access road has been closed due to slips and washouts; and when the soil under the building was found to be less stable than you first thought.
 
Because of these circumstances, earthworks have taken longer than was planned. The earth was dug out to the level required under the café, store and office buildings creating what started to look like a swimming pool. At this point, the engineer tested ground conditions and found that the bearing capacity of the soil was much less stable than anticipated. To picture less than ideal bearing capacity, imagine that the building is a glass of water and the ground beneath it is a fresh, wet cow pat. 
 
This obviously needed to be made stronger. After considering multiple options, it was decided the best way forward was to bring in pumice to create a more solid platform.
 
Given the state of the roads, we were only able to deliver two loads of pumice a day – but at long last, around 1500m3 and 960 tonnes later the pumice platform was ready for foundations to be set up.
 
Pumice Platform_1
 
Pumice platform_2
 
The team on site is ready for the first large concrete pour for the floor slab of the Tribal Office building. This was scheduled to take place on Saturday, but the current rain has beaten us again! The pour takes ALL OF FIRTH’S TRUCKS from Rotorua out of circulation for the day so they're coming at their next available date, this Thursday 29th June.
 
The team has set up shutters which the concrete will be poured into (much like a cake tin) and laid a damp proof membrane which stops moisture rising from the ground into the floor. They've set up reinforcing steel which makes the concrete floor slab even stronger. This was inspected and approved by the engineer this morning.
 
Reo_1
 
While the floor is drying, people are invited to come and place a handprint in the concrete at 1230pm on Thursday 29th June. The concrete will be covered up, so the handprints will be like a time capsule and a memory of those living in the area at the time.
 
Reo_2
 
A silver lining from the cyclone delays is that while the great-pumice-move was taking place, the team on site was able to divert their attention to construction of the chalets, which wasn’t planned to start this early in the piece. Four chalets of varying sizes are nestled into the bush at the back edge of site. 
 
The team cleared only low shrubbery and trees necessary to locate the buildings with minimal impact on the ecosystem in the bush. This also means that the bush creates privacy for those staying in the chalets. Firewood was cut up and delivered to those who needed it most locally.
 
Because the chalets are smaller than the other buildings, they’re supported on simple timber piles with concrete footings. This photo shows one of the chalets timber piles and the view that will be experienced by those who stay there.
 
Chalet_1
 
While some of the team are preparing for the concrete pour for the Tribal Office Building, others are preparing the pumice platform under the Store and Café building, shown in the photo below. The team will repeat the same process on the second floor slab and before we know it, we’ll be able to see how all of the buildings are located!
 
 
Tribal_1
 
Let us know what else you’d like to hear about in the comments below!
 

 

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Blog

Getting out of the Ground

It’s always an exciting moment when you can say ‘we’re out of the ground’, meaning you’ve gotten through the bulk of earthworks, ground conditions are ticked off and you’re into foundations of the building. ...

News

Reflections on 30 years for DOC

Department of Conservation turned 30 on April 1 and Malcolm Smith, a community ranger based in Wairoa, reflected on the past three decades. DoC was formed by merging conservation aspects of the Forest Service, Department of Lands and Survey and the Wildlife Service in 1987.... Read more >>

Marae

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Array ( [item_id] => 898 [title] => Te Urewera at rest [html] =>

No one really knew the damage Debbie would cause and for most people it brought tragedy to their everyday lives and their homes.  But for one person, this was an opportunity for having the biggest natural makeover in one night.

Cyclone Debbie came with its mighty winds and rain then powered its way through Te Urewera.  The winds too powerful for our trees were found on the ground lifeless.  Our rivers and streams flowed viciously with a deafening roar causing the earth beneath to become soft and frail creating slips and damage to structures. 

Te Urewera was evacuated the very next day and signs went up to close the Great Walk.  And for the first time in many years, Te Urewera was alone. 

The day after the storm I was travelling home after work and couldn’t help but stop to look at the view.  The mist was hovering above and coming down ever so slowly as if to blanket Te Urewera.  The mountain ranges in the distant showing different shades of blue with the tip of some ranges lightly covered by the mist. Waikaremoana was still and calm and among all this there was silence.  Seeing Te Urewera this way gave me the feeling she was having a long overdue rest she so deserves. 

Te Urewera has played host to millions who come from far and near to free their minds from the pressures of living in the so-called concrete jungles.  Can you imagine hosting that many people in a year?  I would definitely be drained and tired and planning a retreat away.  Te Urewera plays a vital role in people’s lives, for some she’s a counsellor, for others she’s a friend.  For whatever reason we visit this ancient being, she has the experience to host and offer a remedy we seek for the heart, soul and mind.  For us humans, we have places to go to re-energise ourselves.  But Te Urewera doesn’t have that luxury of going on a retreat.  If she cannot go anywhere then something or someone has to come to her.  Like a person, Te Urewera needs a break from all this.  To me, Cyclone Debbie was the retreat that Te Urewera has waited and yearned for.     

I believe Cyclone Debbie brought goodness to this spectacular being.  Debbie simply came and gave Te Urewera a total makeover.  Old trees were pulled from their roots to give way to the next generation of trees.  New waterways crafted providing sustenance to more of the land and its species and landslides formed a new layout to the land.  Not only did Debbie change the shape and form of Te Urewera but it also freed her from human contact. 

So next time you’re in Te Urewera and you are here to find yourself or rejuvenate yourself remember you are not alone.  Te Urewera is right there sharing the same reasons for your visit but she is also tending to your inner needs. If she can do that, then we should also contribute to returning the favour.

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Blog

Te Urewera at rest

No one really knew the damage Debbie would cause and for most people it brought tragedy to their everyday lives and their homes. But for one person, this was an opportunity for having the biggest natural makeover in one night. Cyclone Debbie came with its mighty winds and rain then powered its way through Te Urewera. The winds too powerful for our trees were found on the ground lifeless. Our rivers and streams flowed viciously with a... Read more >>

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Te Uru Taumatua

Te Uru Taumatua represents the Tūhoe nation and the lands and wealth held in common for Tūhoe.   The purpose of the Governing Board of Te Uru Taumatua is to lead and serve the cultural permanency and prosperity of Tūhoetana by unlocking the unity potential of Mana Motuhake.  Advancing Tūhoe social and economic development in a way that is distinctively Tūhoe recognises that we will build the Tūhoe nation with our minds, our hearts and our hands.

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The purpose of Iwi Registration is to build the Tūhoe nation by registering in a central place the descendants of Tūhoe tipuna Tūhoe or Potiki and those who affiliate to a Tūhoe Marae and Tūhoe Hapū.  Your Iwi Register is based on Tūhoe whānau and Tūhoe hapū.