Search Site
Lead In Image Block: Image 1

Lead In Image Block: Image 1

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Array ( [item_id] => 749 [title] => Lake Waikaremoana continues to welcome manuhiri [html] =>

24 June 2016

Press Release  

Lake Waikaremoana continues to welcome manuhiri

Business continues as usual at Lake Waikaremōana, “We have around 80 people coming to Waikaremoana to trek and camp over the next few days” says Richard Wagner staff member at Te Urewera – Waikaremoana Visitors Centre.

Local Waikaremoana kaumatua, Te Kooti Turipa, is indifferent to the news of the rāhui ban being placed on Lake Waikaremoana led by an individual from Auckland. “I’m dead against any ban” emphasises Te Kooti Turipa of Waimako Marae.

Waikaremōana Tribal Authority and community members are disappointed that the rāhui is being misused to interfere with public enjoyment of Lake Waikaremoana. “This goes against the purpose of rāhui” states Rose Pere.

Tūhoe kaumātua Harry Waiwai is critical of his younger brother leading the action “To get to the point I don’t support it” and “What he needs to do is get home and start cleaning the toilets before he starts doing that. I have had enough of his nonsense.”

“Speaking on behalf of Tūhoe we don’t take that statement made about a rahui on Lake Waikaremoana as having any substance and we are just carrying on with our business and our work programmes at Waikaremoana. However, we are concerned that members of the public that use Waikaremoana may feel that the statement is supported by us. It is not.” – Tamati Kruger, Tūhoe – Te Uru Taumatua Chairman.

The team at the Te Urewera Waikaremoana Visitor Centre are on hand to assist the public with any enquiries by calling (06) 837 3900.

END

For media enquiries contact – Tūhoe Te Uru Taumatua Communications korero@ngaituhoe.iwi.nz

[image_id] => 0 [width] => [height] => )

News

Lake Waikaremoana continues to welcome manuhiri

24 June 2016 Press Release Lake Waikaremoana continues to welcome manuhiri Business continues as usual at Lake Waikaremōana, “We have around 80 people coming to Waikaremoana to trek and camp over the next few days” says Richard Wagner staff member at Te Urewera – Waikaremoana Visitors Centre. Local Waikaremoana kaumatua, Te Kooti Turipa, is indifferent to the news of the rāhui ban being placed on Lake Waikaremoana... Read more >>

Marae

He huinga whānau, he herehere tangata....

Array ( [item_id] => 742 [title] => Straight outta the valley! [html] =>

Growing up in the Rūātoki valley , Te Okiwa McLean-Mika (Ngāti Tawhaki, Te Whānau Pani, Hāmua) attended local kura before heading to Te Aute college. In his final year, Te Okiwa was awarded prizes at the senior’s prizegiving including the Meroiti Whānau Whaikōrero Trophy and placing 1st in NCEA Level 3 Te Reo Māori. This laid the foundation for him to gain entrance to University where he chose to study a Bachelor of Māori Development, majoring in Media Studies at AUT.

Te Okiwa Mclean dropped into Te Kura Whare so we caught up with him to see how his studies were going.

“My goal is to become a reporter for Māori news, current affairs. Whether that be Te Kaea, Te Karere. I would like to move home and cover stories from around this region. That’s my ultimate goal, to carry on doing the same work but doing it back here at home.”

Also a keen haka man, Te Okiwa spends his free time with Te Tirahou where they spend most of their time practising their pukana, refining their haka moves and competing in sports days.

“There is a lot of Tūhoe people in Auckland, they keep you grounded. A home away from home. So Te Tirahou is a whānau where we can always get together.”

When asked what being Tūhoe means to him, Te Okiwa looks over to his mates sitting at the end of the table. Shrugs his shoulders and laughs.

“Being Tūhoe means everything, especially living away from home. But the Tūhoe lot in Auckland, it’s pretty tight...you may not have met them before, and then when you meet them, it’s just like you’ve already known them, for a long time – you just click straight away, that bond.”

At this years Te Hui Ahurei a Tūhoe, Te Okiwa performed with the Te Tirahou, judged the tamariki kapa haka AND filmed tamariki and pakeke at the ahurei, as part of his final assignment at Universtiy. Proving he has the skill to juggle his time and priorities.

Sitting under the bright solar lights of Te Kura Whare, Te Okiwa’s eyes begin searching through the window and I get the feeling he is getting itchy feet. I ask him about his hopes for Tūhoe.

“My hope for Tūhoe? A way forward. The Ahurei is a path for our ranatahi and taiohi to see like University students working on projects for the Iwi and for the people.”

 

...and you know what whānau, just recently this fulla scored his dream job! Tau Ke Te Okiwa!

to

[image_id] => 0 [width] => [height] => )

Blog

Straight outta the valley!

Growing up in the Rūātoki valley , Te Okiwa McLean-Mika (Ngāti Tawhaki, Te Whānau Pani, Hāmua) attended local kura before heading to Te Aute college. In his final year, Te Okiwa was awarded prizes at the senior’s prizegiving including the Meroiti Whānau Whaikōrero Trophy and placing 1st in NCEA Level 3 Te Reo Māori. This laid the foundation for him to gain entrance to University where he chose to study a Bachelor of Māori... Read more >>

Forum

A space to share your marae kaupapa ....

Te Uru Taumatua

Te Uru Taumatua represents the Tūhoe nation and the lands and wealth held in common for Tūhoe.   The purpose of the Governing Board of Te Uru Taumatua is to lead and serve the cultural permanency and prosperity of Tūhoetana by unlocking the unity potential of Mana Motuhake.  Advancing Tūhoe social and economic development in a way that is distinctively Tūhoe recognises that we will build the Tūhoe nation with our minds, our hearts and our hands.

Our People

Ko koe, ko au, ko tāua, ko tātau ka toa......

Iwi Registration

The purpose of Iwi Registration is to build the Tūhoe nation by registering in a central place the descendants of Tūhoe tipuna Tūhoe or Potiki and those who affiliate to a Tūhoe Marae and Tūhoe Hapū.  Your Iwi Register is based on Tūhoe whānau and Tūhoe hapū.