Search Site
Lead In Image Block: Image 1

Lead In Image Block: Image 1

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 2

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Image 3

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: Our People

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Lead In Image Block: taonga

Array ( [item_id] => 877 [title] => Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana opens [html] =>
Lake's tribal base open for business.
 
“SPECTACULAR”, “stunning” and “incredible” are just some of the words guests used to describe Lake Waikaremoana’s new Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana.
 
The long-awaited opening of Waikaremoana Tribal Authority’s new building saw guests travel from all over New Zealand to be part of the special day.
 
Visitor experience manager Derek Brenchley said work on the $6 million living building went right down to the wire.
 
“We worked into the night and were up again early this morning,” Mr Brenchley said.
 
The grand unveiling was the culmination of years of planning, months of building and tireless efforts of many individuals, including the Waikaremoana Tribal Authority and volunteers.
 
The new building melds seamlessly into the lake-scape and houses several different spaces.
 
“The main focus of the building is tribal affairs,” Mr Brenchley said.
 
“This is where the Tribal Authority sits: the general manager Waikaremoana Tribal Authority, health manager, service delivery manager and finance staff.
 
“Then we have a cafe component, a learning space and a small retail/visitor information section.”
 
Mr Brenchley says his function as the visitor experience manager is to run the cafe and the retail space/visitor information space.
 
“The stories we tell about Waikaremoana have to come from Waikaremoana Tribal Authority. They need to be approved as true and accurate records of their history.
 
“I’m the link between Waikaremoana Tribal Authority and Te Uru Taumatua.”
 
Mr Brenchley, who has managed Waikaremoana Holiday Park with his wife for the last three-and-a-half years, says despite living at the lake and spending time up at Waikaremoana as a child, there has been a lot of learning for his new position.
 
“It’s a very interesting and fascinating role,” he said.
 
The opening of Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana began with a blessing by kaumatua at 4am. Later there was a Pohiri and a walk-through of the new facility.
 
It was shoes off for everybody on the beautiful timber floors reclaimed from the recently-demolished Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre.
 
A celebratory feast and entertainment began in the afternoon and continued into the evening.
 
Mother Nature smiled on the event. After a rainy start to the day, the sun shone brightly allowing hundreds of guests to enjoy the building and the breathtaking scenery before the thunder began and rain clouds rolled in.
 
Mr Brenchley said aside from downing tools for a couple of days as a result of a snow fall mid-winter, work had been continuous since breaking ground in the second week of February 2016.
 
[image_id] => 0 [width] => [height] => )

News

Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana opens

Lake's tribal base open for business. “SPECTACULAR”, “stunning” and “incredible” are just some of the words guests used to describe Lake Waikaremoana’s new Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana. The long-awaited opening of Waikaremoana Tribal Authority’s new building saw guests travel from all over New Zealand to be part of the special day. Visitor experience manager Derek... Read more >>

Marae

He huinga whānau, he herehere tangata....

Array ( [item_id] => 872 [title] => Te Urewera Search and Rescue [html] =>

Search and Rescue (SAR) New Zealand recently invited volunteers from Te Waimana Kaaku Tribal Authority and Te Uru Taumatua to take part in a local SAR training.

hh

Based at the Lions Hut in Waimana, SAR experts took Tūhoe volunteers through a simulated exercise experience to train them up on the skills, knowledge and planning that goes on behind the scenes in a Search and Rescue operation. 

Te Waimana Kaaku Biodiversity Manager Tom Brown said the SAR exercise scenario was the rescue of two internationals lost in the Te Urewera. The lost party had left messages, one on their car, and another nailed to a tree, but neither of the messages could be understood as they were in French. Brown, said that the scenarios presented real-life issues around communications. Search and Rescue have identified the need for specialist technology, that allows for cellphone reception to increase their access to secondary support options - such as translators.

Ōnukurani kaimahi and Waimana local, Wi Mason, was also involved in the search.

“On the first night we didn’t finish searching until 2am. We were tracking their footprints and looking for other signs of movement such as littered orange peel and logs that had been moved off the track. It was a really helpful exercise, getting to know how a SAR operation works.” Wi said.

Ōnukurani Project Analyst, Moana Andrew said they were given the opportunity to observe and participate in specific skills such as modern search techniques, tracking, manning the radios, and participating in problem solving and decision making. “The highlight of the exercise was the lesson on character profiling lost parties and their behaviours in order to translate this information to map coordinates.” Moana said she gained new insight into the SARS operations and the need for more volunteers to assist in SAR operations.

Check out how you can become a volunteer of Search and Rescue New Zealand here.

[image_id] => 0 [width] => [height] => )

Blog

Te Urewera Search and Rescue

Search and Rescue (SAR) New Zealand recently invited volunteers from Te Waimana Kaaku Tribal Authority and Te Uru Taumatua to take part in a local SAR training. Based at the Lions Hut in Waimana, SAR experts took Tūhoe volunteers through a simulated exercise experience to train them up on the skills, knowledge and planning that goes on behind the scenes in a Search and Rescue operation. Te Waimana Kaaku Biodiversity Manager Tom Brown said... Read more >>

Forum

A space to share your marae kaupapa ....

Te Uru Taumatua

Te Uru Taumatua represents the Tūhoe nation and the lands and wealth held in common for Tūhoe.   The purpose of the Governing Board of Te Uru Taumatua is to lead and serve the cultural permanency and prosperity of Tūhoetana by unlocking the unity potential of Mana Motuhake.  Advancing Tūhoe social and economic development in a way that is distinctively Tūhoe recognises that we will build the Tūhoe nation with our minds, our hearts and our hands.

Our People

Ko koe, ko au, ko tāua, ko tātau ka toa......

Iwi Registration

The purpose of Iwi Registration is to build the Tūhoe nation by registering in a central place the descendants of Tūhoe tipuna Tūhoe or Potiki and those who affiliate to a Tūhoe Marae and Tūhoe Hapū.  Your Iwi Register is based on Tūhoe whānau and Tūhoe hapū.