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The sleepy Eastern Bay settlement of Ruatoki played host to thousands during Easter weekend as the 42nd Hui Ahurei a Tuhoe took place.

Three days of kapa haka, sport and debate, all designed to bring iwi together and strengthen the identity of Tuhoe, culminated in a prize-giving on Sunday night where Te Karu were named overall haka winners with Ngati Haka Patuheuheu in second and Tawera Kaipuha third.

The first Hui Ahurei was held at Mataatua Marae in Rotorua in 1971 and since then, the event has grown to be the biggest and longest-standing iwi festival in New Zealand.

It is held every two years but the last festival was held three years ago. The 2016 event was the first post-settlement for Tuhoe.

On Friday a pohiri was held at Te Rewerewa Marae to open the event. Thirteen children's haka groups performed on Friday, while the different ropu debated a number of issues including "It is right that Te Urewera have its own sovereignty", and "Tuhoe agrees that cannabis should be legalised". Rugby games were also played.

On Saturday the highly competitive senior kapa haka got under way at 8am and continued through until well after 6pm with 15 groups taking to the stage.

Tuhoe passion and pride was evident in each of the haka performances with the crowd of thousands reacting each time a point was made through word or waiata. Sunday hosted netball and prizegiving. Prizegiving was followed by performances from the Battle of the Band's winners, the Modern Maori Quartet and Ardijah.

Rotorua Daily Post

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Festive fun as hundreds compete

The sleepy Eastern Bay settlement of Ruatoki played host to thousands during Easter weekend as the 42nd Hui Ahurei a Tuhoe took place. Three days of kapa haka, sport and debate, all designed to bring iwi together and strengthen the identity of Tuhoe, culminated in a prize-giving on Sunday night where Te Karu were named overall haka winners with Ngati Haka Patuheuheu in second and Tawera Kaipuha third. The first Hui Ahurei was held at Mataatua... Read more >>

Marae

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waikareiti row boat lakeRow-Boats Return To Lake Waikareiti

Manuhiri have enjoyed exploring the deepest corners of Te Urewera. She is valued for her abundance, stunning scenery and hidden wonders.

The ‘jewel of Te Urewera’ is often how manuhiri describe Lake Waikaremoana, however just a stones-throw away is hidden another precious gem, Lake Waikareiti.

Over many years, Waikareiti has been a destination respected by fishermen for the abundant supply of rainbow trout; and is appreciated by intrepid folk looking for adventure.

With Te Urewera Board announcing the reinstatement of the Lake Waikareiti row-boat service late last year, there has been a steady influx of new and returning manuhiri looking to experience the jewels of Te Urewera.

Improved features of the row-boat service include increased safety standards. As Lake Waikareiti is an hours walk away from the Aniwaniwa visitors centre, each row-boat is now issued with a mandatory Personal Locator Beacon (PLB). In an emergency, the digital beacon can be activated, which sends a signal to a satellite that then relays that message to rescue authorities.

While staff at the Aniwaniwa visitor centre emphasize safety messages, manuhiri have provided feedback on their experience of the row-boat service:

“One of the best experiences our whānau have ever had! Fantastic tramping with children, only 1 hours tramp in then 1.5 hours rowing. Awesome. Keep it as is!”(Julz Parry, Rotorua)

“What an amazing experience to be on a pristine lake, it is really something quite special. It is definitely worth doing.” (Ray Large, Katikati)

Waikaremoana Tribal Authority welcome the return of the row-boats for manuhiri to enjoy this unique experience. Row-boats are available for hire from the Aniwaniwa visitor centre for $20 per session and a PLB will be issued with each hire for $15. From the Aniwaniwa visitors centre it is an easy one hour trek through native forest to Lake Waikareiti where the row boats, life-jackets and oars are kept. Call the Aniwaniwa visitor centre on (06) 837 3803

While our Waikareiti manuhiri enjoy their row-boat experience, we advise you that the islands on Lake Waikareiti are currently out of bounds due to pest control.

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Blog

Row-Boats Return to Lake Waikareiti

Row-Boats Return To Lake Waikareiti Manuhiri have enjoyed exploring the deepest corners of Te Urewera. She is valued for her abundance, stunning scenery and hidden wonders. The ‘jewel of Te Urewera’ is often how manuhiri describe Lake Waikaremoana, however just a stones-throw away is hidden another precious gem, Lake Waikareiti. Over many years, Waikareiti has been a destination respected by fishermen for the abundant supply of... Read more >>

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Te Uru Taumatua

Te Uru Taumatua represents the Tūhoe nation and the lands and wealth held in common for Tūhoe.   The purpose of the Governing Board of Te Uru Taumatua is to lead and serve the cultural permanency and prosperity of Tūhoetana by unlocking the unity potential of Mana Motuhake.  Advancing Tūhoe social and economic development in a way that is distinctively Tūhoe recognises that we will build the Tūhoe nation with our minds, our hearts and our hands.

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Iwi Registration

The purpose of Iwi Registration is to build the Tūhoe nation by registering in a central place the descendants of Tūhoe tipuna Tūhoe or Potiki and those who affiliate to a Tūhoe Marae and Tūhoe Hapū.  Your Iwi Register is based on Tūhoe whānau and Tūhoe hapū.