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More than 20,000 people flocked through the gates at Rūātoki over the weekend to take part in the biennial festival, Te Ahurei a Tūhoe. Held to celebrate the unity among Tūhoe, the festival involves the tribal members taking part in competitions including kapa haka, rugby, netball and...

Some descendants believe Tūhoe's goal for self-determination will be a major challenge. Paki Nikora from Ngāti Rongo says, “They say self-determination lies with the tribe. But to me, there are two issues, self-determination of sub-tribes and self-determination of  tribes as a whole. Which one takes precedence?” Te Uru Taumatua (TUT) is the governing body for the tribe and is responsible for managing the tribe's...

A great event begins from behind the scenes. Hundreds of volunteers have dedicated hours of their time to ensure the festival runs without a hitch.  He's a man on a mission, for more than three decades Rameka Tuhaka has dedicated his time and expertise to his people and to this Tūhoe celebration. Tuhaka from Ngāti Hamua says, “We're fully committed to running these events for Tūhoe, and our families. We're here doing...

Te Kāea looks back at the festival during the 1970's through images taken by a well-known Māori photographer, John Miller. He and the late Hirini Melbourne were tasked with the project to publish a school journal, capturing images of this unique festival.  It's a snapshot of Tūhoe 40 years ago. “It was very fascinating because a lot of locals were a bit bemused about what I was doing,” says...

Hui Ahurei a Tūhoe, why is it important for the descendants and what it means to them.  This is the longest running tribal cultural festival in NZ. “This is the heart of Tūhoe and people here say that the festival is what brings people home,” says Hori Uatuku from Te Mahurehure. With a population of 35,000 strong, the festival creates a path for Tūhoe to achieve a 40-year plan to self-govern. Tom Brown is here with...

It was all hands on deck at Rūātoki yesterday as Tūhoe prepare for their biennial festival, Te Ahurei a Tūhoe, which starts tomorrow. First held in 1972, the three day festival at Mission Road, Rūātoki celebrates unity within the tribe and every second year thousands of people who affiliate to it make the trek back to the Eastern Bay over Eastern weekend to participate in kapa haka, debating and sports...

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