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All Te Urewera catchments received significant amounts of rainfall from Ex-Cyclone Debbie resulting in many rivers exceeding historic peak flood levels. Road closures has meant access being cut off to some areas in Te Urewera. Visit Whakatane (www.whakatane@govt.nz) and Wairoa District Council (www.wairoadc@govt.nz) websites for updates on the roads into Te Urewera.

Manuhiri looking to spend time in Te Urewera need to take extreme care while interacting with Te Urewera. We advise avoiding routes and tracks where all bridges are needed to cross waterways. Manuhiri should prepare for significant track damage due to slips, tree-fall and bank erosion, and be prepared for impassable tracks.

For those Manuhiri camping in Te Urewera treat all drinking water by boiling it or using water purifying tablets.

Feedback including photos of tracks and short walks can be emailed to tina@ngaituhoe.iwi.nz or dropped off to our staff at Te Kura Whenua, Waikaremoana.

Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk Track -

Is temporarily closed until further notice, with an update due on the 12th April allowing for a full inspection of a range of critical facilities and structures to be carried out. Our Team have identified a range of significant remedial works required, and are working towards opening part of the track as soon as safely possible.

Boating on Lake Waikaremoana -

There is a significant amount of debri floating around the lake, carried down from the rivers and streams - extreme caution is necessary.

Ogilvies, Waimana Valley -

There is a slip off Ogilives and is yet to be assessed by the Council.

Te Urewera Weather

More wet weather is forecast for mid next week for Te Urewera. Visit the Metservice website for weather information for Te Urewera- www.metservice.com.

To be kept up to date go to our website www.ngaituhoe.iwi.nz or follow our Te Urewera facebook page. All those booked to do the Great Walk over the next week contact Te Urewera Visitors Centre on 06 837-803 or 06 837-3900 to make changes to your booking.

Ends

 

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All Te Urewera catchments received significant amounts of rainfall from Ex-Cyclone Debbie resulting in many rivers exceeding historic peak flood levels. Road closures has meant access being cut off to some areas in Te Urewera. Visit Whakatane (www.whakatane@govt.nz) and Wairoa District Council (www.wairoadc@govt.nz) websites for updates on the roads into Te Urewera. Manuhiri looking to spend time in Te Urewera need to take extreme care while...

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In the mid 1800s Crown forces invaded Te Urewera.

It was the first time they used "scorched earth" tactics - raising Tūhoe kāinga at Lake Waikaremoana.

But now the iwi is back - stronger than ever.

Manuhiri Visitor Experience Team Leader Tina Wagner says : "This is the first building we've had here since our people were removed."

Tūhoe signed an agreement with the crown in 2013.

Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana has now been open for nearly two months.

"Although we were physically removed we still had that connection here and we always have had that connection here."

It was built as part of the Living Building Challenge - constructed from non-toxic materials and recycled parts of the former DOC building.

The design features charred walls - in a chilling echo of the history here.

The building doubles as a tribal office and Department of Conservation facility.

Visitor Experience Manager, Derek Brenchley says: "You come to our entrance and we will come to you and tell you our story, you don't just rock up and rip a pamphlet out of the holder and then walk off and only get a small snippet of what you need to know."

And it's a system that appears to have paid off.

"We've noticed an increase in numbers earlier in December than previous years, and right through until after Waitangi weekend."

About three quarters of visitors are North Islanders - but there are also those from much further afield:

"United Kingdom, Australia, Germany and America," Mrs Brenchley says.

By the time summer rolls back around holiday park renovations will be finished

And - the team here says the self-contained units will be as good, if not better, than accommodation found in the city.

NZ Herald

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In the mid 1800s Crown forces invaded Te Urewera. It was the first time they used "scorched earth" tactics - raising Tūhoe kāinga at Lake Waikaremoana. But now the iwi is back - stronger than ever. Manuhiri Visitor Experience Team Leader Tina Wagner says : "This is the first building we've had here since our people were removed." Tūhoe signed an agreement with the crown in 2013. Te Wharehou o Waikaremoana has now...

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Te Urewera, the mountainous homeland of Ngai Tuhoe, the Children of the Mist, spent 60 years as a national park — a brief period really, considering the place still holds evidence of its seabed origins millions of years earlier.

It was disestablished as a national park in 2014, as a result of the Ngai Tuhoe Treaty of Waitangi settlement, and is now administered by the Te Urewera Board, which comprises joint Tuhoe and Crown membership. Long story short, Te Urewera was given its own legislative act as part of the Crown’s settlement with Ngai Tuhoe in acknowledgement of the very real and dense connection and history between the people and the place. Te Urewera is now actually a legal entity, with all the rights, powers, duties and liabilities of a legal person. I know, right?!  Fascinating.

Te Urewera is an absolutely stunning landscape, overflowing with enough lakes, walks and ancient native forests to quench the nature-lust of any hiking addict or outdoor zealot.

But it is also a land so jam-packed with stories of romance, tragedy and heroism that it could easily fill six seasons of an antipodean version of Outlander. Imagine Antonia Prebble, transported back in time into the arms of the brave and charismatic Te Kooti as he evades the villainous Colonel Whitmore. Or maybe she finds herself becoming one of the wives of prophet Rua Kenana just before his Maungapohatu settlement is raided. Television gold!

And that’s just a couple of stories from Te Urewera’s post-colonial history, some of which were laid out by the late Judith Binney in her last ever book Encircled Lands: Te Urewera 1820–1920. None of that even touches the depth of the pre-colonial history, populated with more characters and intrigue than the entire catalogue of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire (the book that inspired the TV series Game of Thrones).

But if the coming and goings of the human animal don’t tickle your imagination, how about the roaming patterns of giant reptiles? That’s right, the hunt is on for dinosaurs in Te Urewera. Ngai Tuhoe, GNS Science and Victoria University are on a mission to uncover fossils there. Imagine you were to come across remains millions of years old when trekking through the forest? Well, it’s not as crazy as it sounds. The late Joan Wiffen did just that when she found a toe bone from a theropod dinosaur, the smaller cousin to the infamous T. rex, in the Urewera Ranges. Forget national park . . . try Jurassic Park! Amazing.

Beauty in the mist

Of course, the main reason most people head for Te Urewera is for the breathtaking scenery. It has a disarmingly untouched and isolated feel about it. Mix that with incredibly stunning, panoramic vistas and you will undoubtedly feel that primal communion with nature you probably didn’t even know you were craving.

Even just driving through the middle of Te Urewera between Murupara and Wairoa gives you that sense. It takes a long time and it’s slow going. If you are unused to isolated areas, then there will be moments when you will think to yourself ‘Ummm . . . did I take a wrong turn? This doesn’t feel like a road I should be driving on . . . I feel like I’m really far from anything . . .’ Your heart-rate will then inevitably elevate a little as your instinct to grab your phone takes over your hand. Of course, you know it before you see it . . . but you have to check: no coverage.

My only advice is this: you didn’t take a wrong turn; there’s pretty much only one road in and out. Take a deep breath, turn off your phone (you’re only wasting the battery), sit back and enjoy the ride. This is why you came. That feeling that you are really small and young and the thing surrounding you is really big and old. Accept the new perspective this offers.

You see, part of the beauty of Te Urewera is that it really doesn’t care who you are or what you do for a living. It doesn’t care if you are or aren’t Tuhoe, and it certainly doesn’t care about your stress. It just is. And there’s the magic: that something so beautiful and amazing can be that way without even trying.

Then there’s Lake Waikaremoana, which you will not be able avoid, thankfully. It is a body of water that I could use more adjectives to describe but really, it’s best if you just go there. My words cannot do it justice. The first time you see it, though? If you’re approaching from the Murupara side (my recommendation), it will take your breath away. Here’s a tip: try not to be the one driving. You are up high and the view across the lakes is — well, yeah, like I said, just go.

Where do I sign up?

The thing with Te Urewera is it’s big. There is a lot to see and do. You will probably have to go more than once. Who knows, you might be one of those people, of which there are many, who go back annually.

It is also a place that can be as dangerous as it is beautiful. The Department of Conservation website has all the info on activities open to the public as well as important alerts and safety tips. Make sure you are well informed and well prepared for your chosen activity.

But really, it’s worth it. It is a true taonga in every sense of the word, and here for all of us to experience. All you have to do is decide to go. The custodians of Te Urewera, Ngai Tuhoe, welcome you to share in its majesty. Nau mai, kuhu mai.

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Te Urewera, the mountainous homeland of Ngai Tuhoe, the Children of the Mist, spent 60 years as a national park — a brief period really, considering the place still holds evidence of its seabed origins millions of years earlier. It was disestablished as a national park in 2014, as a result of the Ngai Tuhoe Treaty of Waitangi settlement, and is now administered by the Te Urewera Board, which comprises joint Tuhoe and Crown membership....

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Korean man missing from Te Urewera
 
Wednesday, 8 February 2017 - 7:39am
Eastern
Wairoa Police and Search and Rescue are searching for a 59-year-old Korean man who was reported missing from the Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk in Te Urewera. 
 
He was last seen at the Panekire Hut on 7 February 2017 and was expected to be at Onepoto by 1pm for a scheduled pick up. The alarm was raised when he was not there at the agreed upon time.
 
Police are still working to confirm his personal details and will advise these as soon as possible.
 
Police cannot yet rule out that he may have left the bush earlier than scheduled and hitch-hiked to a new location.
 
Police are seeking any information from anyone who may have seen or picked up a Korean man, who appears around 59 years old and is of medium build, from Te Urewera or Wairoa area.  He was last known to be wearing a blue merino top and light brown/sandy coloured pants.
 
If you have information about this man please contact your nearest Police Station or the Wairoa Police Station on 06 838 8345.
 
ENDS
 
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Korean man missing from Te Urewera   Wednesday, 8 February 2017 - 7:39am Eastern Wairoa Police and Search and Rescue are searching for a 59-year-old Korean man who was reported missing from the Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk in Te Urewera.    He was last seen at the Panekire Hut on 7 February 2017 and was expected to be at Onepoto by 1pm for a scheduled pick up. The alarm was raised when he was not there...

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Hours into a six-day tramp in Te Urewera, an experienced tramper became injured and needed rescuing. Jost Siegfried 69, and Jaden Kaemfe, 14, planned to tramp from Maungapohatu to the Waimana River over six-days, beginning on Sunday. 

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Te Urewera tramp cut short

18 January 2017

Hours into a six-day tramp in Te Urewera, an experienced tramper became injured and needed rescuing. Jost Siegfried 69, and Jaden Kaemfe, 14, planned to tramp from Maungapohatu to the Waimana River over six-days, beginning on...

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The family of a Japanese tourist who died in a hut blaze in the former Te Urewera National Park has been able to find closure to his death after visiting the site where he died. 
 
Katsuya Tsuchida and his fishing guide, New Zealand resident Toshiya Babe, died when the Department of Conservation hut they were sleeping in burnt down in December 2007.
 
An investigation by Police and the Fire Service found the incident to be the result of a tragic accident where they suspect the fire was caused by a lit candle or gas cooker.  
 
The officer in charge of the recovery operation and subsequent investigation, Detective Senior Sergeant John Wilson and Murupara Police Constable Rob Hutchins erected a memorial near the site. 
 
On Boxing Day last year Mr Katsuya’s daughter, Honoka Tsuchida visited the site with Mr Wilson. In a statement to the media she thanked New Zealand Police for the opportunity.
 
"It was a precious experience that I could finally visit the place where my father died and meet Mr John Wilson who helped and supported us for a long time,” said Ms Tsuchida.
 
Mr Wilson said returning to the site to take the family was a special moment.
 
“I feel privileged to have been there and been able to help this family get more of an understanding of what happened to Katsuya,” said Mr Wilson.
 
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The family of a Japanese tourist who died in a hut blaze in the former Te Urewera National Park has been able to find closure to his death after visiting the site where he died.    Katsuya Tsuchida and his fishing guide, New Zealand resident Toshiya Babe, died when the Department of Conservation hut they were sleeping in burnt down in December 2007.   An investigation by Police and the Fire Service found the...

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